Sybil Morial takes friends on the journey of her family’s rise from slavery

Sybil Morial takes friends on the journey of her family’s rise from slavery

As a result of the autumn mild deepened exterior the Antioch Baptist Church on the grounds of Whitney Plantation, a coolness settled throughout the 100 or so people in pews, their eyes locked on the petite nonetheless commanding presence seated on the picket dais.

As Dr. Ibrahima Seck, Whitney’s evaluation director, held the microphone, Sybil Haydel Morial study from her memoir, “Witness to Change: From Jim Crow to Political Empowerment,” first deciding on the chapter about when she discovered her great-grandfather, Victor Haydel, was a slave on the once-brutal sugar cane plantation.

The model new paperback model offers Morial a wider viewers. The newest event at Whitney Plantation celebrated the discharge of the paperback.

Born 67 years after he was freed by the 1865 Emancipation Proclamation, Morial traced her Creole family’s hardscrabble journey from slavery to educated docs, attorneys, educators and civil rights leaders “in solely three generations.”

Morial, whose husband, Ernest N. “Dutch” Morial, was New Orleans’ first African-American mayor, acknowledged she started writing the e-book so her youngsters, along with former Mayor Marc Morial, and grandchildren would know the struggles that civil rights leaders wanted to bear to realize the rights that some have come to take without any consideration.

— Submitted by Melinda Shelton, Social Scene columnist

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