A beautiful French Quarter second-line for Henry Butler

A beautiful French Quarter second-line for Henry Butler

Sunday (Oct. 21) was a surprising night to say goodbye to the late New Orleans pianist Henry Butler with a second-line by the French Quarter. Forgiving fall temperatures had lastly arrived, the lights alongside North Rampart Avenue ignited at dusk and the Goodyear blimp floated throughout the sky, reflecting the brassy sunset someplace over the horizon.

Butler died of most cancers in New York Metropolis on July 2 at 68 years of age, nevertheless he began life throughout the 504, rising up throughout the Calliope housing enchancment. He was sightless since infancy and taught himself to play piano by ear. On the Louisiana State College for the Blind, he found to memorize classical scores written in Braille sooner than translating them to the keyboard. At Southern School, he honed his resonant singing voice. By maturity, he was gigging in plenty of the golf tools Sunday’s second-line rambled earlier.

The small parade assembled on the Voodoo Lounge, on the Intersection of Rue Orleans the place a curious crossroads of New Orleans custom handed off. As a result of the musicians who would lead the parade began to gather exterior, the Saints polished off the Baltimore Ravens in a good recreation that elicited many an emotional outburst contained within the tiny lounge. Within the meantime, a gaggle of thrill-seekers assembled on the same location to embark on a haunted historic previous tour of the Vieux Carre as shortly as the game clock ran out.

Saints and ghost-seekers and jazz musicians? All on the an identical nook? A stone’s throw from Congo Sq.? Butler would have appreciated that.

The Nightcrawlers, an all-star marching band, led the procession alongside the ever-flamboyant dancer Jennifer Jones. Scores of Butler’s followers and Crescent Metropolis custom devotees, some from as distant as Brazil, waved followers bearing Butler’s smiling gap-toothed portrait. Blue NOPD bike lights splashed the construction as a result of the parade grew to become the darkened French Quarter near the glowing entrance arch over Armstrong Park.

– – –

Doug MacCash has the easiest job on the planet, masking paintings, music and custom in New Orleans. Contact him by e-mail at dmaccash@nola.com. Adjust to him on Twitter at Doug MacCash and on Fb at Douglas James MacCash. As always, please add your standpoint to the comment stream.

Be the first to comment on "A beautiful French Quarter second-line for Henry Butler"

Leave a comment

Your email address will not be published.


*